Picasso said, “every child is born an artist. The problem is, how to remain an artist when we grow up.” The older we get, the more we are frightened of being wrong. Children, on the other hand, aren’t afraid of being wrong. They attack life with excitement, curiosity and plenty of gusto.

 

It is predicted that the children starting school this year will retire at the age of 70. However, academics and theorists can’t predict what the world will be like in five years time, and yet, they’re expected to educate these children for it. 

 

Our education system was developed as a result of the industrial revolution. The subjects considered most important, and are thought to require the most intelligence, are reflected by this time. As Sir Ken Robinson mentions in his Ted Talk, intelligence takes many forms.

 

It is diverse and it is dynamic. Intelligence is not subjected to a few distinct subjects.

 

Whilst the mathematicians, scientists and engineers are all very intelligent, intelligence is also the ability for people to think differently and derive value from doing so. Intelligence is not looking at things from one perspective. In other words, intelligence can also take form in creativity and innovation.

 

Even one of the smartest men of all time, Albert Einstein, said, “imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge is limited, imagination encircles the world.”

 

In our programs, we love seeing the extraordinary capacities that children have for creativity and innovation. Often, we will provide them with a real workplace issue, and they have to try and solve it. Their responses and ideas aren’t always feasible, but they are truly remarkable and really show us adults how limited our imagination has become.

 

Now, as technology continues to develop faster than  humans can manage, maybe it’s time to focus more on the human side of things, like creativity and empathy, to build and foster creative and curious minds for the future.

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